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from sipsey street irregulars comes this sad tale of how far down the stazi hole our nation has fallen,

25 Oct

“If they can’t kill you. . . they’ll make you crazy.” Behind the Scenes, the Cover-up Games Continue. Keep the whistleblowers in your prayers.


A week ago Friday, I decided to have some new business cards made up at Staples. Dropping off the image, I was told that they would be ready Saturday morning. So, after I left the AGCA gun show early to visit with my daughter Zoe before she returned to college, about mid-day on the way home I stopped by to pick them up.

I observed to the counter guy that it looked like the whole order wasn’t there. He told me that someone had asked to see the order earlier representing himself as my “business partner” and had taken a few, saying that I wouldn’t mind.

Uh, huh. Of course, I have no business partner and no one knew that I had ordered the cards but me and Staples. The description of the “guy in a suit and sunglasses” was sufficiently vague and I had to get going to see my daughter off so I didn’t immediately demand to see the manager and the surveillance tapes. In retrospect, David Codrea, among others, has beat me up about this and he and they are probably right.

In any case, there are a couple of explanations for this latest nudge of the elbow from the secret police, one more innocent than the other. The least threatening one is that some gestapoman either got bored enough (or was told) to “count coup” on me to rattle my cage. The other is that they were looking for “evidence” to plant somewhere later on somebody — at a crime scene or on a dead criminal for example.

Paranoia comes easy when you have real and powerful enemies, but I learned in the 90s that you can’t succumb to it for if you do they have won already. It is in the enemies’ interest to make the opposition paranoid. I know, I do it myself back at them. Just ask Ramsey A. Bear. All’s fair on the cold war battlefield we play on.

So, the only immediate countermeasure I took was to tell some trusted friends about it. All of them took me to task, especially David, for missed opportunities to turn it around, and I will be exploring some possibilities of that today with Staples and the local police. It was David who insisted last week that I write about it, however, and thus I am doing so now.

I suppose I am guilty of nonchalance with stuff like this. After all, it has been happening to me off and one since the 90s. I no longer watch for multi-car tails — that sort of thing is so 20th Century — and always assume everything about me is known to the servants of the Federal Leviathan. That way you just don’t have to worry about it and you can have much more fun than they do.

(I actually can’t wait for the next administration to get here so I can get a real FOIA document dump on me so I can check my entire multi-agency Stasi file. It should be very instructive.)

However, there is no doubt that this kind of crap has an effect on people unused to being on the receiving end, especially many of my sources and especially the whistleblowers. Folks will call me, and immediately get a ring-back from “Restricted Number” after they hang up, usually with a female voice asking pardon for a wrong number. Black bag jobs on homes and businesses with no alarms going off and video surveillance mysteriously interrupted or missing are commonplace, often with something taken or a familiar object placed in some manner that cannot be accidental, just to let the victim know that they were there.

The Lone Wold Trading Company, for example, according to federal sources familiar with the incident, was broken into and 30 firearms were taken without the alarm being tripped. ATF supervisor Hope MacAllister later told owner Andre Howard, according to those same federal sources, that the ever vigilant ATF video surveillance system didn’t recover the images of the intruders because the system was, she claimed, turned off at the end of the business day and restarted every morning. “Howard didn’t believe it,” said one source, “and he shouldn’t. None of the thirty firearms stolen that night have ever been traced in the system.” They just . . . disappeared.

The ATF whistleblowers, to a man, are under constant pressure from their supervisors and some, but not all, of their fellow agents. This has effects on their lives, their relationships, their health — all of which it is designed to do by the Gunwalker plotters. “If they can’t kill you,” said one federal source, “they’ll make you crazy. And if they can’t make you crazy, they’ll make your life a living hell.”

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Posted by on October 25, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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